5: He makes Philip dream that she by a god conceives her saviour.

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saw him touch her womb, and seal it with a golden ring. And
on this ring there was a stone, and graven on this a lion's head,
and the chariot of the sun, and a very sharp sword. And he
[4] said to her : ' Woman, thou hast conceived thy saviour.' And
Philip awoke from his sleep, and calling Arideus, made known
to him the dream, and what he had seen. And Arideus said :
' Philip, not from man, but from a god, hath thy wife conceived.
[8] In truth, the lion's head and the chariot of the sun and the
sharp sword, foretoken that he, who shall be born of her, shall
journey to the East whence riseth the sun ! And with the
sharp sword shall he underyoke to himself the nations of the
[12] whole world.'

HOW ANECTANABUS IN THE SHAPE OF A MIGHTY DRAGON WENT TO THE FORE IN THE FRONT OF PHILIP AND OVERCAME HIS ENEMIES IN THE FRAY.

In the meanwhile, King Philip fought and won. For there
appeared in the battle a dragon, who went before him and laid
low his foes. And when he came back to Macedonia, he met
[16] and kissed Olympia. And King Philip gazed on her, and said,
' To whom, O Olympia, hast thou given thyself up. For
sinned thou hast, yet not sinned, for as much as thou hast
brooked frowardness from a god. But I have seen all that has what has
[20] been done by a god on thee, in a dream : therefore be blameless
in my eyes, and the eyes of all men ! '

HOW ANECTANABUS IN THE SHAPE OF A DRAGON CAME BEFORE PHILIP AT A FESTIVAL AND KISSED OLYMPIA.

On a certain day Philip was feasting with his lords and
chieftains of Macedonia and with Olympia his wife. And
[24] Anectanabus through wizardry took on himself the shape of
a dragon, and, passing through the midst of the couch whereon
they lay apart, whistled so loudly that all the revellers were
stricken with fear, and the greatest dread, and coming near
[28] Olympia, he put his head on her breast and kissed her. Philip,
seeing this, spoke to Olympia, ' Woman, thee and all I tell ;

beheld this dragon, what time I laid my enemies low.'

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Laura

I love how easy it is to include comments here that will show both the original and translated pages.